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Neil Armstrong
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Mr. Grosky and Neil Armstrong Email Hoax

A great story and an entertaining joke, but not true at all. This one has been floating around so long people are starting to believe it is true. It is not true. Here it is, completely false but reprinted for your entertainment:

Here is the email - Remember it is a FAKE:


When Apollo Mission Astronaut Neil Armstrong first walked on the moon, he not only gave his famous "One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind" statement but followed it by several remarks, usual com traffic between him, the other astronauts and Mission Control.

Just before he re-entered the lander, however, he made the enigmatic remark, "Good luck Mr. Gorsky." Many people at NASA thought it was a casual remark concerning some rival Soviet Cosmonaut. However, upon checking, there was no Gorsky in either the Russian or American space programs.

Over the years many people questioned Armstrong as to what the, "Good luck, Mr. Gorsky" statement meant, but Armstrong always just smiled.

On July 5, 1995 in Tampa Bay FL while answering questions following a speech, a reporter brought up the 26 year old question to Armstrong.

This time he responded. Mr. Gorsky had finally died and so Neil felt he could answer the question.
When he was a kid, he was playing baseball with a friend in the backyard. His friend hit a fly ball which landed in front of his neighbor's bedroom windows. His neighbors were Mr. & Mrs. Gorsky.

As he leaned down to pick up the ball, young Armstrong heard Mrs. Gorsky shouting at
Mr. Gorsky. "Sex! You want sex?! You'll get sex when the kid next door walks on the moon!"


And if you want to see the humorous side of hoax emails, read the spoof of the bubble-boy scams.


Copyright CFR 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009  - Definition of scam, fraud, etc.Legal disclaimer / corrections / complaints  -  Privacy Policy
Names used by scammers in the examples on this page and others often belong to real people and businesses who often have no knowledge of nor connection to the scammer's use of their name and information.  Sample scam emails and other documents are copies of the scam to help potential victims recognize and avoid it.  You should presume that any names used and presented here in a scam are either fictitious or used without their legitimate owner's permission.
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