Consumer Fraud Reporting
Astrology / Psychic
Reporting on the Latest Frauds, Scams, Fake Lotteries, Spams and Hoaxes

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Astrology and Psychic Scams and Fakes

What are astrology scams?

Psychic scams prey on people’s emotional vulnerabilities. Self-proclaimed psychics claim to have had visions or have foreseen your lucky numbers. These scamsters advise that you could come into a fortune if only you send funds to mail boxes for talismans, golden eggs or fortune telling guides to personal wealth. Or that the psychic will give you a reading or session. And of course, it usually starts with a free reading, "just for you".

 For a fee, they will send your lucky numbers, “wish amplifiers”, talisman or other paraphernalia, which will bring you great personal wealth, often through playing lotteries or other games of chance. The talisman are often plastic junk items such as beads or even cards.

The material is normally bulk mailed from overseas thought it appears to be specifically written to you (thousands of others may have been mailed the same request).

If you received a letter from a psychic, please send us a copy! This is only one example of this so-called psychic’s letter. There may be other letters peddling similar useless lucky charms and paraphernalia.

See below for specific scams and see this page for how to try to get a refund and how to stop their emails.

List of astrology/psychic/clairvoyance services

The most recently added scams are listed below. All the names have appeared on promotional material mailed to residents of the U.S. and other countries. Click on the links (on names that are blue and underlined) for additional details.


How did the Psychic Scammer Know Your Email Address?

These so-called psychics do not actually know you.  They simply got your name from a mailing list.  These mailing lists are lists of names and email addresses that scammers sell to each other.  The names and addresses on them are people who they believe are gullible victims.  The addresses were harvested by spyware from online forums and discussion groups where you may have left a note and from viruses and spyware that harvest email addresses from Outlook contact lists from infected personal computers.

Some points to remember are:

  • Always guard your personal details to ensure you don’t end up on a scammers’ mailing list.
  • Use a free Yahoo, Gmail or Hotmail email address for emails to and from people you don't know and for registering on websites that request an address.  Keep the email address from your home internet account (ISP) private!)
  • If you do start receiving much spam on your home email address, get your ISP to change the address.  Most ISP (internet service providers, like AT&T, Verizon, BT, AOL, etc.) allow you to change your own address.
  • Think twice before responding to offers of free horoscopes – this is one ploy used by some scammers to get your details.
  • Before entering into competitions, check the privacy provisions to see whether your personal details will be passed on to third parties.
  • Always read the fine print on any offer.
  • Don’t hand over your credit card, driver's license number, passport number , social security number, bank account information, birth date or other details to unknown persons or companies. (shouldn't a true psychic know it all already???)
  • If you are interested in contacting a psychic, deal with locals rather than a faceless person, a PO Box or an overseas return address.

How can I get my money back and my email address and name off their emailing lists?

If you have paid money, ask them for a refund and ask that they take your name off their mailing list. It is important to state your name and address exactly as it is typed on the letter or email you received. If there is no information offering a money back guarantee or the ability to unsubscribe, then don’t respond to the letter or email.  

 If you receive multiple letters, check whether your name and address is spelt differently. Click here to view a template letter that you might like to use.

If you have not paid them and have not responded to them,  don't reply to them - that will just ensure you get more spam, because you are confirming that your address is active.  Instead, just change your email address.


DATE:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To whom it may concern

 

 

ID / REGISTRATION / ACCOUNT NUMBER

 

I am writing to request that I not receive any further mail and state as follows:

 

1.            Please remove my name and address from your mailing list and the mailing list of your associated companies;

 

2.            Please do not pass my name and address to any other companies;

 

3.            Please notify your list broker to remove my name and address from their mailing list.

 

Thanking you.

 

 

Yours sincerely

 

 

 

 

 

Name (as it appears on letter)

Address (as it appears on letter)

 


For other exposes'  and discussions of psychic scams and frauds, see these links:

 

FAQ's from "Gypsy / Spiritualist Scams"

Exposing the Truth: Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What is "cold reading"?  
  2. How does the fortune telling con work? 
  3. What is a "confidence crime"? 
  4. What is a "Gypsy" exactly, and where do they come from?  
  5. How could a whole culture of people -- Gypsies -- really all be that focused on crime and ripping people off without any conscience at all? How could they do it so convincingly?  
  6. If it's really phony, then why would they go to so much trouble to put on an act? Why would they make us undergo such elaborate prayer in their living rooms? Why so much effort? Aren't there easier ways to steal someone's money?  
  7. What about all the Christian/religious stuff in their homes? All of their talk about God and Jesus and goodness?  
  8. If these Gypsies are really stealing my money, then why do they all live in such modest, run down homes in need of repair? Where does the money go?  
  9. "I can see where other Gypsies are scam artists pretending to be psychic healers. But mine really is. She does really care, I've seen it. And she knows too much about me to not have powers. She cares too much."  
  10. You're at rock bottom (And this spiritualist truly cares and wants to help you) What are your options?

Copyright CFR 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009  - Definition of scam, fraud, etc.Legal disclaimer / corrections / complaints  -  Privacy Policy
Names used by scammers in the examples on this page and others often belong to real people and businesses who often have no knowledge of nor connection to the scammer's use of their name and information.  Sample scam emails and other documents are copies of the scam to help potential victims recognize and avoid it.  You should presume that any names used and presented here in a scam are either fictitious or used without their legitimate owner's permission.
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